Tag Archives: mayonnaise

  1. 5 Minute Green Goddess Dressing / Dip {Dairy-free}

    This gorgeous, vibrant Green Goddess Dressing is ready in under 5 minutes and it’s loaded with so much flavor. This creamy, dairy-free condiment can be served up as a salad dressing, dip, sauce or spread. Sorry not sorry in advance if you become as addicted to it as we are!

    5 Minute Green Goddess Dressing / Dip {Dairy-free}

    5 Minute Green Goddess Dressing / Dip {Dairy-free}

    I am not sure exactly where the term “Green Goddess” originated when speaking of a tasty green dressing, but I am not mad about it. Not at all. Clearly something this beautiful, brilliant and delicious is female! DUH.

    I have seen many many iterations of the Green Goddess dressing and many call for yogurt or other dairy and ALL the green things. This particular rendition gets it’s creaminess from avocado and delicious avocado oil mayonnaise. There is a prominent basil flavor and aroma which is peppery and fresh, with parsley is a backup singer. If you want to have some fun, swap out the basil with cilantro (I’d say go with more like 1/2 cup since it’s a bit stronger), swap lime for the lemon and add jalapeño. Voila, another version of this amazing sauce.

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  2. Dairy-free Ranch Dressing {Paleo}

    Dairy-free Ranch Dressing

    Dairy-free Ranch Dressing

    Ranch dressing used to be one of my favorites. There was a time in my life where my snack of choice was pretzels with two bowls for dipping. One had yellow mustard, the other, creamy ranch dressing! Ah those were the days.

    Nowadays, you know that I prefer to avoid store bought dressings, because most are just loaded with crap (the many offender being vegetable oils), so I choose to make my own. Making your own salad dressings and vinaigrettes is a very simple task, you can control the ingredients, the flavors and the quantity.

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  3. Turkey Club Chopped Salad with Aioli Vinaigrette {Paleo-friendly}

    Turkey Club Chopped Salad with Aioli Vinaigrette {Paleo-friendly}

    Turkey Club Chopped Salad with Aioli Vinaigrette {Paleo-friendly}

    I have jokingly said this before, but I truly, deep down, really mean it. My husband has become somewhat of a muse for me in the kitchen. Or one of my muses I should say. First and foremost, from a heavily selfish place, my own autoimmune conditions, food intolerances and sensitivities are my biggest creative driving force when it comes to recipe development. I also, of course, find so much joy in creating for all of you and your varying dietary challenges and lifestyles. All that said, my husband happens to be one of those more and more rare specimens whom isn’t afflicted with any food allergies or issues. He’s a tank, he can eat anything and everything, he’s healthy as a horse and he generally doesn’t have to worry too much when it comes to food.

    He is, as he says it “on the Beth plan”, at home, as I do all of the cooking and I generally don’t hear a complaint out of him. However, when we eat at restaurants some of his decision-making is so far askew from my own and how we eat at home, that I can (apparently) look at him like he has 3 heads, while he orders. It’s mostly a curiosity of how and why he would still want certain things after eating how we do, I am always curious how eating a bunch of starchy, grainy carbs before a meal can feel good, when he generally eats grain-free at home. I get it though, he didn’t exactly sign up to eat this way, it’s somewhat by default. But, I digress, I don’t give him too much shit, however I do take note. I take these opportunities to know that I can come home and recreate certain foods to be more healthful, to remove some unneeded processed foods and to hopefully win him over with an even better, cleaner version. It’s a game of sorts for me and the winner is always him.

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  4. Seared Tuna with Wasabi Citrus Aioli

    Seared Tuna with Wasabi Citrus Aioli

    Seared Tuna with Wasabi Citrus Aioli

    Seafood has become a staple in our house. At least once a week I serve up some type of seafood. Scallops, salmon, tuna, halibut, shrimp, and many others are on regular rotation around here. Since we moved to the West Coast I have found that my love of seafood has reached new heights. Driving by the ocean daily, will do that to you. Additionally, by way of nutritionist school, I have gained an even deeper awareness of the many nutritional benefits of wild caught seafood, including it’s abundance of omega-3 essential fatty acids, obviously quality protein and of course, fat soluble vitamins A and D and various macro and trace minerals including iodine, selenium, zinc and magnesium. Our soils may be depleted of certain trace minerals, but every mineral we need is in the oceans and seafood is our only sure source for obtaining them all. These are just some of the many reasons high quality seafood at the top of the list for our protein choices, around here.

    Why  Sustainable, Wild Caught Seafood is Your Best Choice:

    Regardless of the long list of nutritional benefits, it so very important to always harbor concern for overfishing and sustainability. Selecting your fish should comes with a responsibility, and hopefully, a commitment to supporting sustainably managed fisheries with a focus on best practices and ethics. I personally want to know the fisherman are using ethical catch methods (hook and line) and that at the heart of the business I am supporting, are small boat fishermen who really care and have a high level of pride in what they do. Those nutritional benefits listed above, you can be sure those will only come with wild cause fish. Just an FYI for those who still don’t know, farm raised fish, often receive antibiotics and inappropriate feed, including soy meal containing pesticide residues. Oh and pssst, farm raised salmon are actually given a dye to make their flesh pink!

    Seared Tuna with Wasabi Citrus Aioli

    One Hook, One Fish at a Time

    Only a small percentage—less than 5%—of Alaska seafood comes from hook and line methods, but what line-caught fish lack in quantity, they more than make up for in quality.  Using a small boat, hook and line fishermen catch and process One Hook, One Fish At A Time. This is a traditional way of fishing that results in an extremely high quality fish. Additionally, the knowledgable fishermen who know where to fish and can pinpoint species with the right lures, results in minimal by-catch.

    A line-caught fish is a superior product and is the most premium quality fish on the market. No fish is handled with more care from the time it leaves the water until it is delivered to a customer than a line-caught fish. With these practices come the belief that each fish deserves to be treated with a singular devotion to quality and the respect due to a wild creature, all the way to the consumer.

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  5. How-to Make Homemade Mayonnaise

    Tutorial Tuesdays // Tasty Yummies

    How-to Make Homemade Mayonnaise from @tastyyummies

    Homemade mayonnaise might be one of my favorite, simple DIY foods. The very first time you make it, you’ll be wondering why you haven’t done it before. Once you see how simple it is to make and how incredibly delicious it is, you’ll be hooked, too. As usual, beyond the taste, what I really love is how I have control over all of the ingredients and I know the quality of the eggs and oil used and I know that there are no additional preservatives or stabilizers being added.

    We get farm fresh pastured-raised eggs delivered to our home weekly, the farmer himself, drops them by. Before you even taste Tony’s eggs, you will notice a significant difference in the color of the yolks, compared to regular store-bought eggs (even the fancy organic, “free range” ones). The color is so vibrant, more of a golden orange color, much like the sun, rather than a pale, pastel yellow, like most eggs. There is truly nothing like farm fresh eggs, everything you make with them is tastier than you can ever imagine.

    How-to Make Homemade Mayonnaise from @tastyyummies

    Most store bought mayonnaises rely on canola oil and other less ideal vegetable oils. What I love about making my own mayo at home is that I can use the highest quality eggs and oils. I generally prefer to use a mix of organic extra virgin olive oil (Terra Delyssa, of course) and either coconut oil or MCT oil. Avocado oil and macadamia nut oil are also both really great options.

    For the purpose  and ease of step-by-step photos and for dramatics (and a good arm workout), I made this batch by hand, just a bowl and a whisk. That’s all you need. But generally I make it in my blender or food processor, which is much easier. An immersion blender would really do the trick. (and it will be done probably in less than 1 minute)

    How-to Make Homemade Mayonnaise from @tastyyummies

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  6. Chipotle Almond Spread / Dip (w/other Favor Variations) – Gluten-free + Vegan

    Chipotle Almond Spread/Dip  (w/other Favor Variations) - Gluten-free, Vegan

    Since we have been here in California I have really been getting back to my roots of making all of my own foods, right down to breads and dips, etc. I sometimes hate the extra time to make things I can buy at the store, but the quality is unmatched and the same goes for the health benefits. When you are making your foods from scratch, there are no unknown ingredients, no preservatives or other junk. Just good clean food.

    Chipotle Almond Spread/Dip  (w/other Favor Variations) - Gluten-free, Vegan

    It is hard to remember why you do it, when your life gets busy and the packaged food is glaring at you from the aisles of the store, with “wonderful” health claims like gluten-free, organic, all natural, non-gmo, etc. But remember this doesn’t necessarily mean it doesn’t have strange, unknown ingredients in it, still.

    I was craving a snack the other day and didn’t want hummus again, but I wanted something similar but sans bean. This creamy spread is thick, still a tad bit chunky (depending on how long you process), and served best with crackers or fresh vegetables as a dip. It is also great spread on a slice of toast or fresh bread, or added to steamed veggies, pasta, rice, quinoa or other grain. It is perfect in a wrap or on a veggie burger and really nice in place of mayo or mustard on your favorite sandwich or in place of mayo in tuna (or mock tuna) salad.

    Chipotle Almond Spread/Dip  (w/other Favor Variations) - Gluten-free, Vegan
    [print_this]Chipotle Almond Spread / Dip (w/other Favor Variations) – Gluten-free, Vegan
    yields just over 1 cup of dip

    • 1/4 cup olive oil
    • 1 cup raw organic almonds, soaked overnight* OR 2 cups of leftover almond pulp (without vanilla or sweetener)
    • 2 garlic cloves, peeled
    • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
    • 2 tablespoon lemon juice (from appox 1/2 lemon)
    • 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast
    • 3 teaspoons liquid aminos (or soy sauce)
    • 1 teaspoon ground chipotle (or whatever herb or spice you prefer)
    • sea salt, to taste
    • 1/4 cup of water (you may or may not need this, and it may be less – you won’t need this if using almond pulp)

    Optional add-ins to change the flavor profile:

    • Spices like chipotle or smoked paprika.
    • Fresh herbs like rosemary, cilantro, mint , basil, etc
    • Vegetables like roasted red peppers, sun dried tomatoes, jalapeños
    • Try roasting an entire bulb of garlic and adding that.
    • The possibilities are endless.

    You can really have fun with this dip and make it however you want. Add in whatever you’d like, make combinations. Just make it your own, the base stays the same, you can just tweak the recipe as you see fit. My three favorite flavors personally are chipotle, rosemary and roasted garlic.

    Place all ingredients in your food processor and pulse just until chunky. You can either continue blending for a smoother spread, or stop while there are still little chunks of almonds. I like it to where it isn’t totally smooth and creamy and a tad bit of the nuttiness comes through. You may want to drizzle in a little water if it seems like it is too thick or chunky, use your own judgment.

    *soaking the almonds is important to making this dip creamy, otherwise you would end up with almond butter if you processed it long enough.

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